10.10.11

Opinion : Peace

Opinion : Peace

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There's always something to strive for, and that makes life worth living.  Purpose is invigorating.  I felt that way even when, a while back, I would say that what's going on in our country politically has nothing to do with me, that I should just ignore all that nonsense. 

Like it or not, I'm affected by the world around me.  And likewise, I affect the world around me.  Given that fact, I decided I should speak up more and now, put principles into practice.  For example:  Moving my funds to a community bank. 

I believe that to remain passive, to convince oneself things are good enough because someone else has it much worse implies on a personal level that there is nowhere else to go and no further to travel. 

I have felt this way before, but it just isn't so. 

To feel one doesn't have the right to speak up, or that one doesn't know enough to do so, suggests stagnation and hopelessness.  This thinking is self-defeating. 

As complex and nuanced as we are as human beings, I don't think we were designed solely to sit in front of a TV, that our only destiny is being passive consumers. (Consider the allegory of "The Matrix" again.) 

Being strong means you can set an example and make moves to help/motivate those less fortunate:  http://www.bostonherald.com/news/regional/view/2011_1007occupy_boston_group_reaches_out_to_homeless/srvc=home&position=recent

What we say about a lot of things has the potential to resound the world over, especially now with the internet -- yes for better or for worse.  But notice that, historically, positive messages have the most resonance. 

Personally, I won't endorse greed as good enough and dog-eat-dog materialism as just the way it's going to be. Might as well lay down and die.  I'm thankful to people who get themselves out of their bubble and out the door and inspire the rest of us.     

Lastly, I recommend MLK Jr.'s Drum Major speech. 

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